Is this why The Inhumans film didn't happen?



Film Despite its nearly eight million views, this is the first time I've seen the MCU's Phase Three announcement from back in 2014. At the time, I remember shuddering that the second Avengers film wasn't going to be released until I was in my mid-forties. Fortunately, I made it and now anticipate the upcoming Phase Four announcement.

It's worth noticing how dates and elements changed in the meantime.  The Sony deal led to everything moving down the schedule to make way for Spider-Man: Homecoming and the relative success of Ant-Man the insertion of a sequel.  But the big anomaly is The Inhumans film, which was quietly cancelled, to re-emerge as a frustratingly average television mini-series.

Why?  One of MARVEL's strengths has been to see what the audience responds to and monopolise on that, making course corrections when necessary.  Thor: Ragnarok was in part a result of the relatively poor critical reception for The Dark World (even if it still did well at the box office).  More Black Panther material was apparently filmed for Infinity War because it did quite well.

I think this video captures the moment The Inhumans as a film was cancelled.  As every other title card emerges on the screen, this audience, made up of comic book experts, go absolutely batshit crazy to the point that the mic on the camera phone sneakily recording it is completely blown out and unlistenable.

When The Inhumans is announced?  Crickets.  Well, not quite.  There's still some cheering but its markedly more muted than for the rest of the announcements and when Kevin Feige returns to the stage afterwards, he sounds slightly defensive as he attempts to justify the selection to a crowd which clearly hasn't reacted in the way he'd hoped.

Was this enough?  Did the reaction of fans at this event cause the hesitation?  Maybe?  As I've suggested elsewhere, reaction to franchises tend to be fan led, and if fandom wasn't in general that fussed about seeing The Inhumans at the cinema, then there was the potential for this to be a difficult sell which was justifiable considering the size of the budget.

But there's also the possibility that as pre-production began on the AIWE doulogy, the idea of having a large population of incredibly powerful beings, even at half strength post-click, was difficult to insert into an already busy couple of films.  Perhaps there's a version of Endgame floating around with Medusa or Nahrees joining the time travelers.

Instead we got the tv series which despite the budgetary input from IMAX couldn't afford to animate Medusa's hair in every episode so had it shaved off and left Lockjaw off-screen with about the same level of nuance as K9 in Season 18 of Doctor Who.  About the only good thing which came out of the series was cancellation because it meant Anson Mount was free to play Pike on Discovery.

On the new Spider-Man trailer.



Film Tom Holland is right. The new Spider-Man: Far From Home trailer is full of spoilers for Endgame as is this short commentary. Here's another video to give you a chance look up. Just in case.



You probably shouldn't watch that either.

Anyway, alternate realities. In the new MCU trailer, Nick Fury suggests that the Mysterio embodied by Jake Gyllenhaal isn't from the MCU Prime universe but some alternate reality, brought through a crack (or whatever) created when during the whole Thanos business.

Immediately this has been seized upon as being utter pig cleanser due to this being Mysterio, who's whole being is about misdirection and subterfuge and that it's all part of some plan or other. They might even argue that the Elementals are also in on the gag, assuming they even exist or an illusion.

Here's my counter argument.

This is Nick Fucking Fury.  Nick Fucking Fury does not simply work from information supplied by someone who says they're an interdimensional traveller.  For him to make that determination, he will have investigated it a bit more than that.

So what if this Mysterio is actually telling the truth?  What if he is indeed from another reality where he works benevolently, might even be the Iron Man of that universe?  That like certain other characters, MARVEL are not going for the obvious explanation?

Which means that this film is setting up the idea of this MCU being part of the multiverse, the very multiverse which Sony have just had great success with in animated form?  That the title "Far From Home" isn't just about Spidey taking a trip to Europe, but to a whole other universe?

Like, for example, the nascent Sony Spider-verse currently inhabited so far by Venom, thereby explaining the presence of the black suit in the trailer?  Could this be what Amy Pascal was talking about in this famous joint interview with Kevin Feige?

To take that further, could we have scenes in which Holland meets some of his counterparts in other realities?  He pitches up in animated form in the Miles Morales universe, or bumps into the Tobey Maguire and Andrew Garfield versions in extraordinary cameos?

The latter was suggested for the Into The Spider-verse but was thought to be too much, which it would have been there, but could the other reason have been because the idea had already been snapped up by MARVEL/Sony for this adventure?

To take this to its obvious conclusion, MARVEL could also use this as an excuse to tie together all of the different version of their property there have been over the decades and even as a mechanism to justify having Deadpool interact with characters from the MCU?

Either that or Mysterio is being played true to form and MARVEL know that we know that they know that we know that they know.  Or something like that.

We Need To Talk About [spoiler] [spoiler] [spoiler].

Film Here we are then at the season finale of the MARVEL Cinematic Universe Season One and after watching it on the same day as that episode of Game of Thrones, I was pretty worn out for at least twenty-four hours.  Avengers: Endgame is a strident classic of its genre is something which should go without saying. As close as we have yet to the film equivalent of an event comic upon which the events in separate "franchises" will surely follow, it's also an incredibly "important" moment for those of us who've become emotionally invested in this universe and characters.

Try as I might, there are some things I've been cogitating about in the week since and although I'm sure you've read some of the following elsewhere (assuming you've seen this behemoth and not a masochist who likes to know everything about a film before you see the film because you don't like surprises) so apologies for the repetition.  Meanwhile, not having written anything length on a keyboard for weeks, I'm finding it surprisingly hard to get my bearings around the Querty.  So apologies for any typos and the like.  I'll try to catch them all.

Here is a necessary block for stuff for anyone who wants to look away.



That should do it.

Still here?  Right then, I'd like to talk about logistics, specifically in relation to those missing five years.

As is established by the climax of Endgame, unlike some of us might have assumed due to the presence of time travel, satisfyingly the Infinity Gauntlet (TM) isn't used to reset the timeline.  Everything which happened, happened.  Stark doesn't have to make the decision to sacrifice the existence of his own child in order to save the timeline, none of that mishegoss.  As he says himself, he wouldn't proceed with the plan unless the timeline remains intact and everyone seems fine with that, especially the audience who now won't have rewatch Infinite War knowing that it's about to be retconned out of existence in the next film.

Endgame creates its own rules about time travel even to the point of having its characters discuss all the usual permutations from films before being told it's all guff, that Back To The Future is bullshit.  Of course it stings that out of all the programmes and films mentioned, even Quantum Leap, that Doctor Who finds itself shunned despite the film featuring an actual companion actress in a starring role.  But disregarding the notion of paradoxes frees the story from any obligations change the future somehow or offer the chance of a universal do-over.  Whatever happens, happens, and there's no changing it.

Some have become quite confused about all of this, but everything is explained in the rooftop conversation between Banner and The Ancient One.  That removing the stones from the timeline won't bust open reality so long as they're returned to their relevant points, to do otherwise would create a separate reality or some such.  Ok, I'll have to watch it again, but the reasoning seemed sound on first consumption and explains why in the final moments, Steve takes Mjölnir with him as well as the stones.  Something plenty of filmmakers forget is that its ok to create your own set of rules for a sci-fi or fantasy concept so long as you follow them yourself.

Anyway, as a result, by the close of Endgame, we realise that when Brulk clicks half the population of the galaxy back into existence, from their perspective its as though they never left and that they're entering a world were the other half are now five years older than them having reached 2023 the slow way by living through it.  Never mind that this is a superhero film franchise, that's a hugely interesting and faintly dystopian concept by itself, large enough to sustain its own film, let alone a television series.  It's essentially a rapture film in which the great one decides to send everyone back after five years because it didn't go as planned.

How does a planet, let alone a universe deal with billions of people who they thought were gone for good suddenly turning up again?  After the emotional realisation that your loved ones aren't dead, you're then left with the problem of what to do with them all.  There are all sorts of logistical and legal matters to attend to.  One does not simply disappear from existence for five years and then return assuming that you'll be able to carry on with your life as though nothing has happened.  Five years is a long time, even in a world in the grasp of collective grief.  For example:

Birthdates

You now have half a planet which is physically and mentally five years younger than the other half but who still have their originally birthdate.  Which means that people who're physically thirteen years old are now eligible to vote, watch In The Realm of the Sense and join the army, not to mention the mess it makes of retirement ages.

The state would have two options.

Either they'd have to redo all of the paperwork to give eligibility ratings depending on whether someone was clicked out or existence or not.  So some kind of mark on the voter rolls in polling stations and a BBFC classification would be 18-certificate (23-certificate for [insert euphemism for those who disappeared for five years]).

Or more radically artificially revise the birthdates of everyone who disappeared.  In the trailer for Spider-Man: Far From Home, when Peter presents his passport, it doesn't have a date of birth on it, no doubt to hide the Endgame spoiler.  Perhaps when that shot's in the actual film, we'll see that Peter's DOB has changed to suggest he was born five years later than he actually was.

On the one hand, it means that everyone embraces a collective lie that at least on paper, there are people who lived on the planet five years longer than their date of birth says they did.  But on the other it saves on an awful lot more paperwork than having to just create new documents.

Assets and housing

Judging by the tone of the opening hour of the film, everyone who disappeared has been pronounced dead, which means that wills will have gone into motion and assuming the heirs also still exist, their assets will have been passed down and either sold off or kept.

The less well off, especially those who were renting will have had houses taken back by landlords and all of the other stuff which happens when someone dies without anyone to take care of their affairs.  Houses cleared of possessions, that sort of thing.

Not to mention everything happening at banks in relation to savings and investments etc.

After the initial shock, society moves on.  Governments make new laws to deal with the aftermath.

Then all of these people snap back into existence and everything they owned is gone.  Their house isn't there any more, either demolished, left empty and sold or rented to someone else.  Their assets have been seized and there isn't yet a legal framework in place for them to get it back.

Not to mention a job.  Apart from in some government departments, vacancies are not kept open for five years.

Perhaps that's were some of the people in the homeless shelter in the Spider-man trailer come from.

A lot of people'll be as lucky as Ant-Man and be able to walk back into their own life, albeit with suddenly having a teenage daughter to deal with.  But the rest might not have a life to return to.

Despite being alive again, they're completely fucked.

Relationships

You pop back into existence and discover that your wife or husband or partner has moved on with their life, perhaps even remarried.  Within perceptual moments you've gone from having a loving home to becoming the outsider no longer legally married, perhaps with a whole new family living in your house.

Or what if you're in a relationship with someone who lost a loved one to Thanos and that loved one suddenly turns up and you realise that your partner was making do.  How does that make you feel?

Also what if you were a young child when your parents went and you've been adopted?  Obviously you should go back to your own parents, but as we know, in custody cases it isn't also that simple.  If its a couple who are now poor, the court may decide the child is better off with the adopted parents.

Nuts.  Again, there's tons of dramatic mileage in this sequence of events on its own.

Premierships

Thinking about that final shot of T'Challa triumphantly returning to Wakanda: did his premiership not pass to a successor?  At all?  Did they wait around just in case?  The implication is that M'Baku or whoever has stepped aside now that the real King is back but will every country on the planet be as accepting of the new status quo?  Political change will have presumably come within those five years and there's bound to be wars and other controversies ensuing when powerful people attempt to retake thrones and dispatch boxes they assumed were rightfully theres.

Technology and the Arts

Just to give this lip service.  Half the planet return to find computers technologically better than they were and there are five years worth of television and film to catch up on.  Even if half the casts have disappeared, you can bet the Tommy Westphall universe is still going strong.  Will you still be able to even play your dvds (assuming they haven't gone to landfill).

Factionalism

Then there are the numpties who want to treat the returnees as second class citizens, who believe that the world was a better place post Thanos and feel like having them come back is the worst.  Not to mention those who thought it really was the rapture and have now been proved wrong.

Sigh, just sigh.

Ravenous 3.

Audio  The titling and story order of this boxed set misses a trick in not referencing Star Trek's Generations.  How hard would it have been to called the third episode, Situation Grimm in homage to Kirk's line to Picard on agreeing to leave the Nexus to battle Soran?  No?  Just me?  The main cover rather over sells the participation of that raft of companions.  They're only in the second episode of the box and it's an otherwise Doctorless episode which is great for continuity purposes but does leave us heading towards disappointment.  Thank goodness its a great episode anyway with some stonking cameos birthed from a hilariously well constructed set up.  There's no doubt, despite my reservations about the Ravenous and the Eleven, I'm enjoying this much more than Doom Coalition which often felt like it was trying to be too clever for its own good.

Deeptime Frontier

Which frame the Ravenous as somewhat like the Par-Wraithes from DS9, in that they've been coaxed out of an anomaly by a nearby space station.  Pretty notable for how it foreshadows the beings the Time Lords become during TW2 in how they're willing to interfere with causality like the renegades they've previously attempted to arrest any time they've come in contact with Gallifrey.  Some might criticise the initial cliffhanger resolution, but for veterans of Terra Firma and to be frank Doctor Who in general, the last minute unlikely intervention when the situation looks hopeless shouldn't be that surprising.  Also enjoying how, now that cross gender regenerations have now been properly established, it's being utilised everywhere.  Readers of the EDAs will be comforatable with the Time Lords changing species altogether.

Companion Piece

Well, phooey.  When it was indicated that Companion Piece was a chance to go back and tie up a long standing piece of continuity, I'd pretty much convinced myself that it would be the long awaited reunion of Eighth and Charley, the latter finally discovering the former is still buzzing around the universe, both of them realising that they'd both been a bit foolish at the close of The Girl Who Never Was, published back in, dear god, 2007.  Instead its something which has been knocking around even longer than that, River Song's equivalent of the Laika moment in Alien Bodies.  All of which said, this is bloody fun romp, largely because Nine is a funnier, more entertaining iteration of that character, with some storming if pretty dark one liners, especially about one of the Doctor's absent friends.  Superb.

L.E.G.E.N.D.

In the making-off documentary on the accompanying about L.E.G.E.N.D., Matt Fitton very carefully says that the Brother's Grimm isn't something either the audios or television series has tackled before which leaves a space for those of us listening a story about a planet which is modelling itself around these fairy tales and being somewhat reminded of Grimm Reality, the BBC Eighth Doctor novel in which the Doctor and his friends find themselves on a planet which is modelling itself around these fairy tales.  The key innovation is drawing the actual Brothers Grimm ala the Goosebumps film which also introduced a version of the author into the hijinks.  Admittedly, it's such a great concept it's surprising a version hasn't turned up on television, although I suppose The Shakespeare Code is pretty similar too if you squint.

The Odds Against

Ok fine, the scenes between the Nine and the Eleven are fun even if there's no doubt they may have benefited from being recorded on the same day (actor availability leading to a split).  The corporeal Nine and the version that exists in the Eleven's memory ganging up together spins, but I think I would have liked more of the earlier incarnations talking to one another across time in different bodies, although that would also have required them to be clearer defined and as the Datacore entry on the Collective demonstrates, it's all a bit of a mishmash apart from those who've had their own narrative agency in a story.  Perhaps there'll be a moment soon, like IM Foreman in Interference, when all of the incarnations will meet in reality and we'll discover what they're really like and why they regenerated.

Ravenous 2.

Audio Quick landmark update. This is the first of the Eighth Doctor mid to late period releases which has the new logo on the front and cover design, which means that none of the spines match any more. Long term fans will remember the pain of this from the VHS releases.  Shifting to use the television logo to cover all the merchandise is always a bold move, especially right now in relation to the blu-ray box sets which are supposed to be all out in five years.  What happens if there's a regime change at the top and Mark Gatiss or Abi Morgan decide that they want something different to whatever Chibbers signed off on?  It's inevitable that we're going to end up with spines with logos which don't match and also don't represent the era upon which they're applied.

Escape from Kaldor

An incredibly good Matt Fitton script which provides the kind of development for Liv that Absent Friends gave to Helen.  The writer apparently opened up his research beyond television to Chris Boucher's MDA novels which then makes me wonder how much the society constructed here also harmonizes with the Kaldor City audios (perhaps it's about time I got around to listening to them) (assuming I can find a copy).  Especially strong is the sense of place.  Who is at its best when it offers familiar environments on other worlds which are almost but not exactly like Earth and having been to London a few times now, it's entirely possible for me to imagine what this shopping centre designed to attract high earners would be like even if in instead robots serving its employees earning an annual salary which is less than the price of handbag.

Better Watch Out

Utterly incredible.  Without the restriction of having to entertain fans and casuals on December 25th, Big Finish offers an all time classic Christmas story which is challenging in both its story and how its told.  A fairly conventional monster story is enunciated through parallel narrators, nested flashbacks and subjective exposition in ways which arguably could only work on audio as it uses our own imagination against us, wrongfooting who we think we're listening to how the action unfolds.  Plus it's completely festive without becoming cloying, partly because of the continuing thread of Liv being entirely noneplussed by contemporary human traditions (although you might wonder given how long she spent on Earth in Dark Eyes how she didn't come across it).

Fairytale of Salzburg

Long terms fans will probably work out the big character twist at the close of the story which just goes to tie up just how much this two part tribute to the Moffat era even it we'll be slightly perplexed by how it resolves itself with Clarke's law stretched to its very limit.  Is this God-like wish giving being an invention for this story or have they been knocking around elsewhere?  Will they be returning in the future, and surely a figure this powerful breaks the Whoniverse if they can just pop in and bend reality in this way?  Wouldn't they be quite useful during the Time War assuming they can take sides?  Also how much of what's happened to [spoiler] has been retained or have they been replaced with a different version with no memory ala Fitz in the EDAs?

Seizure

After two stand alone stories, here's the obligitory arc episode to justify the title on the box.  It's fine.  It's a standard base under seige story set on a dying TARDIS with minimal crew and although the Ravenous's voice is creepy (especially when it's toying with Liv), it simply doesn't feel like a classic monster with enough potential mythology to sustain a whole series.  With some mild rejigging, there's nothing they're doing which couldn't equally have been done just as well with the Daleks in a way which wouldn't be possible with The Silents (for example).  Rather like Buffy's fourth or sixth seasons with their unconvincing Big Bad, so far in Ravenous it's the episodes which don't contribute to the overall story which work best, which I suppose means the Riley in all of this is the Eleven.

Ravenous 1.

Audio When the Time War series was anounced, it seemed like that was going to be the only new Eighth stories in release - but here we are with Ravenous, the continuation of the mid to late period of his adventures, with some Lucie Miller fill-in material also forthcoming so there's plenty more for my bank balance to scream in pain about for the foreseable future.  For the purposes of full disclosure, I write this having already ploughed through the first three boxes together in about a week, so it's with the hindsight of knowing what's to come.  By design, the series as a whole, although with linking elements is a mix of stand alone and arc episodes rather like one of the latter tv series which means we get to hear the characters within less grim and sometimes rompy settings, which is a refreshing change.

Their Finest Hour

Here's Churchill back, in narrative terms, as a sort of World War II equivalent of the Brigadier, drawing the Doctor into the adventure and providing military support towards the end.  Very much a callback to the pre-Dark Eyes type of story but with a glance towards the tv revival with the focus on the Polish participation in the RAF.  The resolution isn't unlike numerous other Who stories in relation an alien faction going rogue, but to an extent all of that is backgrounded to the pick-up from Victory of the Daleks (and The Doctor Dances) about how despite subduing the extra-terrestrial invaders, the war of a particular time period continues with its own, more conventional tragedies.

How to Make a Killing in Time Travel

Something which has become baked in to Doctor Who over the years is that its antagonists tend to ultimately be pretty bold in getting ahead of their plans often designing them in such a way as to be able to revel in the big reveal when it happens, even to the point continuing to pretend to be doing something else, even in private when their only audience in the viewer, reader or listener.  HTMAKITT celebrates the reluctant antagonist, the kind of whose nefariousness is either by accident or happanstance who then attempt to cover things up even though they're entirely aware of the personal gain.  Stralla Cushing is a perfect example, superbly played by Judith Roddy of as the Doctor himself says, "an enormous brain and a complete idiot."

World of Damnation

Let's just put this out front: the Eleventh is becoming pretty tiresome.  Big Finish are clearly enamoured with the concept and there's no denying the dexterity of Mark Bonner's performance as he skips between the various Doctor-like incarnations,but Doom Coalition pretty much exhausted the potential story value of his psychological problems and yet here he is again.  Admittedly it's to resolve the cliffhanger from the earlier series but that could have been dealt with as a one and out, but instead he's being set up as continuing presence going forward which means another few hours of having to listen to the echoey voice treatment and jokeoids which populate his dialogue.  Sorry gang, but he's the new C'rizz.

Sweet Salvation

The Candyman who features here was apparently the original concept for the character before JNT or whoever decided to go instead with a copyright violation for Paradise Towers.  He's a suitably creepy confection, describing all of his tasty treats with all the relish of an Androgum.  This is meat and potatoes Who, with the Doctor attempting to convince the authorities about a threat and gaining their trust in aiding him to battle it off.  But it's also a Matt Fitton script which forefronts this companions, with Liv in full on warrior mode and Helen under suspicion as to her motives with the Doctor ultimately only trusting her because of her actions.  It's not about who you are, it's about what you do.

The few good things about BoRhap: The Movie.

Film Bohemain Rhapsody is not a good film. The reasons have been rehearsed elsewhere and indeed the key weakness, the editing, for which the usually otherwise very good John Ottman received an Oscar, are covered in this video essay:



BoRhap's Oscar buzz remains a mystery. There were better performances this year and certainly better editing. But I pause at the Sound Editing and Sound Mixing. Ironically, A Quiet Place feels like the more worthy winner, but I appreciate why this might have been chosen.

Much of the time, the prefered option with any musical biopic is to have the actor also do the singing, lipsincing is rarely convincing, especially when a voice is so distinctive that if it emerges from another actor's mouth it just doesn't look right.

That's certainly true of BoRhap, but I can see why the members of the Academy thought the intergration of Freddy's voice into the footage deserved recognition.  Frequently, it appears in the background of scenes or in unexpected moments which feel spontaneous.

But the tour de force is the closing Live Aid sequence when Malek et al, helped by some extraordinary production design, recreate one of the most famous concerts in history, right down to Smith and Jones's introduction thrumbing in the background the band's stage entry.

The following video demonstrates the extent of the performance, directing (whoever that was)and sound technical achievements by comparing the film's version (with interpolations from a BD extra) and the original Live Aid footage. You could argue that the world didn't need a hi-definition remount of Live Aid in letterbox but one exists now and its mesmerising.



Admittedly, the sequence also reminds us of how the film's meta-editing choices fudge one of the film's narrative through lines.  One of the important moments earlier in the film is about the adoption of Radio Ga Ga as an anthem and how as well as showing Queen's collaboration it offers a chance for the audience to become involved.

Including that section of Live Aid as seen above would have provided the emotional apotheosis of that, but for some inexplicable reason we get Hammer to Fall instead, which is a fine song but doesn't have the same resonance within the film's narrative arc (such as it is).

But notice how Malek's imitation of Mercury is near perfect, down to gesture and facial expression almost the entire way through and how well synced they are throughout each song, from air punches to the business with the microphone stand.

Even if the actors playing the rest of the band aren't always in the "right" place on the stage, Malek is, almost to the inch.  Even the video's thumbnail shows the attention detail, right doan to how the singer holds his microphone.

Except of course, all this also does is to demonstrate just how magnetic a personality the real Freddie Mercury was on stage and so how much else in the film does a disservice to him and his story.  But I'll give them the Live Aid sequence, even if the wrong bits are in the film.

You Will Now Have My Influence.

About The notion of an "influencer" gives my hives, but there's always been little doubt that I've appreciated any free stuff sent to me over the years for me to review.  Quite how much that has ever translated into actual sales, I'm not sure, especially there's still at least one company which still sends me unsolicited review copies despite me not even having mentioned their product for at least five years.

Amazon announced their influencer programme earlier in the year and having always wanted to set up a store front for this silly old site, I greedly fed in my Twitter details only to be told that I didn't qualify.  Well of course not.  But last night, I decided to try again, but instead with my @shakespearelogs feed with its three thousand odd followers and, well it worked.

Welcome to the feeling listless shop.

For now I'm theming the various "ideas lists" around elements of the blog.

So here's somewhere you can buy all the Hamlets. 

My favourite films of every year since films began. Where available.

All the Sugababes albums, of course, including both versions of Taller In More Ways.

The next big project will be to create a chronological shop for the Eighth Doctor to mirror this old thingIt currently only has his TV adventure.

The idea is that people buy things and I get a kick back.  I'm not expecting anything at all.  It's just taken me ten years to get the first £25 voucher.  It's still exciting to finally have one of these even if it's inherently pointless, especially if I don't get around to updating this blog more often.  But I've been busily trapped in the bloggers dichotomy.

The List:
Have an email read out on @wittertainment.

Film Oh wow, so this happened.

The Set-up:

Dear Mal and Wash,

Just listened to Mark's review of Serenity in a post viewing, hazy miasma (on Sky Cinema rather than an actual cinema) and although it is not a good film I did want to defend at least the central performances from McConaughey, Hathaway etc

Without spoiling the twist that isn't, my impression is that the actors are playing into the requirements of the film's setting and requires performances which hover between a glossy Hollywood style and something altogether more simplistic.

They're doing what is probably expected of them and giving a pitch perfect version of that even if it has no relation to how normal human beings react, because [spoiler spoiler spoiler spoiler and indeed spoiler].

Which isn't to say that it's entirely consistent and the director's other key influence seems to be early 90s erotic thrillers which doesn't make an awful lot of sense given what we learn as the story continues. To say anything else would be too much of a spoiler.

In other words, although this is otherwise a good example of what happens when someone who isn't Christopher Nolan attempts to make a Christopher Nolan film, the Mcconaissance is fully intact as is Hathaway's come back and The Princess Diaries 3 can't come soon enough.

Take care and tinkety-tonkety,

Stuart Ian Burns
Hard fought merit in MA Screen Studies at Manchester University.

The Result:

Well, scroll through to about minute 28 on the podcast.

Yes, that is Simon Mayo reading out the email (including stage directions) and Mark Kermode reacting to it and giving some coherent reasons as to why I'm wrong, or at least being very sympathetic to the performances.

So that happened.  Wow.

5. Have an email read out on @wittertainment.

Night, night.

Life As part of my cognitive behavioral therapy, I've changed my sleep pattern. So I've been going to bed at 10pm and waking at 6am. The knock on effects are plenty more energy, feeling more awake than I have in years and having so much more time to myself.

Two whole hours to get myself together, watch some television, read and have breakfast before work in the morning and sleeping in the post evening film period when I was usually wanting to nod off anyway, too tired to work, essentially clock watching until bedtime.

But more importantly my anxiety has become more manageable and understandable. It's still there and I have had a few wobbles in the past couple of weeks, but I feel more like the version of myself I like to be than I have in ages.

Will this lead me writing more?  Don't know.  I hope so.  Having consciously worked myself out of spending life trying to decide how I'll be blogging about it later rather than enjoying it, to then actually write about it could be viewed as counter-productive ...

The resurgence of Indonesia’s movie industry.

Film Indonesia's filming and presentation industry is booming with new cinemas opening and local productions increasing. Bloomberg reports:
"A sign of the changing lifestyle is tucked away behind Cinema 21’s venerable art deco-style Metropole, which was built when Hollywood itself was going through a golden age. In a low, white building, part of the chain’s Premiere brand, wealthy Jakartans pay 100,000 rupiah ($7.07) each to view the latest blockbusters in cosy theaters that offer waiter service and big, padded armchairs that recline at the touch of a button."
Why does this matter?

Because if cinemas are to survive, presentation has to be improved. The seating and projection of films in the average UK multiplex is dreadful, especially considering the considerable price being charged. With the lowering windows between theatrical and digital releases, large screens simply aren't enough.

There's much to be learnt from the Indonesian model.

Patient Zero is now an Oscar Winner.

Film Despite blotting its copy book by effectively having Driving Miss Daisy beat Spike Lee again (not that Spike was nominated in the best picture category in that year even though he should), last night's Oscars was an utterly thrilling piece of television. Without a host, it focused more closely on the films themselves rather than having to awkwardly entertain the audience with extra-curricular activities. But more than that, with the odd exception, the award winners were a diverse cross section of artists representing an incredibly high standard of film making. That a MARVEL film now has three academy awards and in the areas it most excelled at is historic.

Of course the best moment for some of us who've been watching television comedy and drama for the past twenty years is Olivia Colman's win.  Numberwang's Olivia Colman, Look Around You's Pam Bachelor, Green Wing's Harriet Schulenburg, Twenty Twelve's Sally, Rev's Alex, Peep Show's Sophie, Broadchurch's Ellie and yes, Doctor Who's Patient Zero.  She apparently made her television debut in 1995 as a contestant on the Win or Weep section of Channel 4's The Word and now she's an Oscar winner and I couldn't be happier because its an example of the working inside the system and how the unlikeliest of outcomes is always still possible. 

Anyway, let's see how I did.

BEST PICTURE
Like: "Roma"
Will: "A Star Is Born"
Did: "Green Book"

ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE
Like: Marina de Tavira, "Roma"
Will: Amy Adams, "Vice"
Did: Regina King, "If Beale Street Could Talk"

ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE
Like: Richard E. Grant, "Can You Ever Forgive Me"
Will: Sam Elliott, "A Star Is Born"
Did: Mahershala Ali, "Green Book"

FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM
Like: "Roma"
Will: "Roma"
Did: "Roma"

ORIGINAL SONG
Like: "When A Cowboy Trades His Spurs For Wings" - "The Ballad of Buster Scruggs"
Will: "Shallow" - "A Star Is Born"
Did: "Shallow" - "A Star Is Born"

ANIMATED FEATURE FILM
Like: "Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse"
Will: "Isle of Dogs"
Did: "Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse"

ADAPTED SCREENPLAY
Like: "BlacKkKlansman"
Will: "BlacKkKlansman"
Did: "BlacKkKlansman"

ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY
Like: "Roma"
Will: "The Favourite"
Did: "Green Book"

ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE
Like: Olivia Colman, "The Favourite"
Will: Glenn Close, "The Wife"
Did: Olivia Colman, "The Favourite"

DIRECTOR
Like: Alfonso Cuarón, "Roma"
Will: Adam McKay, "Vice"
Did: Alfonso Cuarón, "Roma"

PRODUCTION DESIGN
Like: "Black Panther"
Will: "Black Panther"
Did: "Black Panther"

CINEMATOGRAPHY
Like: "Roma"
Will: "Roma"
Did: "Roma"

COSTUME DESIGN
Like: "Black Panther"
Will: "The Favourite"
Did: "Black Panther"

SOUND EDITING
Like: "A Quiet Place"
Will: "Bohemian Rhapsody"
Did: "Bohemian Rhapsody"

SOUND MIXING
Like: "Black Panther"
Will: "Bohemian Rhapsody"
Did: "Bohemian Rhapsody"

ORIGINAL SCORE
Like: "Black Panther"
Will: "Black Panther"
Did: "Black Panther"

VISUAL EFFECTS
Like: "Avengers: Infinity War"
Will: "Ready Player One"
Did: "First Man"

Not a bad tally.  Of the categories I paid attention to, even if I didn't guess that it would win, at least I suggested that I'd like it too.  But in years to come, when the ceremony itself becomes a faded memory and it just exists as this list, people will ponder about some of the choices as the reputation of some of these films grow just as other recede.

Who are the Sugababes?

Music Amelle guest presented something called Access All Areas on Fubar Radio and the Sugababes inevitably became part of the discussion. There is some new information:

(1) Things were fractious when Keisha left and it sounds as though there's still an undercurrent of something. They met eighteen months ago and had a nice conversation about the old times, and apologies were swapped, but they're still not friends. Lord knows what happened here then. But she is still mates with Heidi.

(2) "She doesn't have the name." "Who doesn't have the name?" "Keisha. She doesn't have the name. We have it still."

(3) The final three members are apparently in discussion for a European tour, where they still have a following. This year or next year.

(4) "There are so many different scenarios. Like after a tour we then maybe do a tv show to pick a new group of Sugababes."

Fucks sake, this is ridiculous.

Anyway, Amelle doesn't seem too keen on much of it. But she did joke about having all six of them together on stage which as you know I've been clamoring for, working through the various iterations.

The podcast ends on About You Now, which is apparently Amelle's favourite, so here's a recording of three people on a stage singing the same song in completely different realities at the same time:

Jeff Bezon: The Original Hero (amazon.com)



Commerce The first section of Heroes.com concerns what the author calls "Internet Tycoons: The network-centric visionaries" which she says are about "grand ideas that shape future business models". It's primarily an exploration of the key figures online from about 1994 until the publication date of the book in 2000 and as we'll see only a few of them survived in the roles they had then.  That's what makes this book such a fascinating snapshot - throwing phrases like visionary around in the time before Google entered the mainstream.

As you can see it begins with the big kahuna, Jeffrey Preston Bezos, Time Magazine's person of the year in 1999, even then with a wealth of £4.87m and in charge of what was, even then, the largest book retailer online.  His entry/interview is exactly as you'd imagine, with much talk of a customer-centric experience but with a slightly cautionary tone that it wasn't quite working yet.  This was still the period when the company was perpetually in the red, with £350m in losses in 1999.  Rather like Spotify later, I used to will them to go into profit just so they could stick around.

In 1995, there were three internet connected PC with a web browser in the two main libraries at Leeds Metropolitan University and you had to book them specially for an hour at a time and its during one of those sessions I first looked at Amazon and the variety of books available with their US covers of the kinds of what were for a Liverpool student in Leeds probably quite marginal topics and far too expensive in shipping terms for me to buy right then.  So I didn't look at the site again until around the time this book was published.

My first purchases were in October 2000.  A copy of the Miller's Collectables Guide of that year as a Christmas present for my Dad and Doctor Who - The Troughton Years on VHS.  I think - the ability to see your order history seems to be down at the moment.  Here's how the front page of the .co.uk version of the website looked at just that moment:



Few things say turn of the century culture more than Buffy, The X-Files, The Blair Witch Project and the All Saints album, Saints and Sinners. Notice that this was still mostly a dial-up era in the UK, so there's still plenty of white space and few graphics. The top selling DVD is Gladiator and the book is The Beatles Anthology.

But notice in the options at the bottom EZshops, which was a separate section back then but would be later integrated in the main search results as secondary sellers and an auction section which was Amazon's short lived attempt to be eBay.  Here's the .com version:



Notice how everything is dumped in together chart wise, that Happy Potter was already in the ascendancy, and that the big new release in books is a nine hundred page history book. In case you're wondering, this is George Lucas in Love. In the days before YouTube, short films would be made commercially available on VHS, even eight minutes shorts like this. Apparently is outsold The Phantom Menace one day.  Sonny.

The Wikipedia's pretty comprehensive on Jeffrey's subsequent career and we all know how we feel about him as a person, such is his ubiquity.  Little perhaps, could the fresh faced, fleece snuggling Princetonite smiling in these pages imagine that within twenty years he would have made an enemy of the POTUS and be writing an open letter to the publishers of the National Enquirer which includes a description of the racy photographs in their position which they're threatening to publish.

Amazon itself has become an existential threat to the high street and it's possible to argue that some chains have closed as a direct result of people buying their nick-nacks online rather than in shops.  Book stores are making a come back apparently, as are record emporiums selling vinyl so it seems as though the businesses which provide items and an experience which Amazon can't replicate will survive, but there'll be a lot of pain in between.

For completion sake, here's how the front page of .com looks to me now:



The front page changes depending on user experience and interests now.  It's detected I live in the UK, hence the notice that they ship worldwide.  Graphics heavy it assumes the user knows that they sell everything so doesn't feel the need to include that information in tabs across the top.  But I do miss the more curated front page - it suggests to the user some things they might not necessarily have heard of in a way which, ironically since its designed for that, an algorithm can't manage.  If I've bought one fridge, I don't need to see twelve suggestions for others I might like.

Whatever happened to the dotcom Heroes?



History It's now twenty years since we first installed an internet connection at home. A dial-up 56k "Surftime" package from BT only available at evenings and weekends, it cost about as much as the fibre connection we have now and would take twenty minutes to download an mp3. But as way into the world and increasing my quality of life it was incalculable.  Although I'd had access to the web since university in 1993, the ability read news and blogs and do everything else in my own bedroom was incalculably cool.  If anything the web feels smaller now, habit leads us to view the whole thing through a Twitter or Facebook feed and the variety of innovation feels limited.

About a year later on the other side of the millennium, Louise Praddow's "HEROES.COM: the names and faces behind the dot com era" was published.    One of numerous books released about the web at that time, it's a fascinating survey of what were considered the most prominent websites of the era and the entrepreneurs staking their livelihood (or that of their investors) in the new frontier through the medium of interviews alongside the smiling faces of their subjects.  Or as Praddow characterises them in the acknowledgements, "the individuals who are shaping the future [...] changing the way we work and play, braking away from the corporate rules of the past".

Two decades on, how does this version of the web measure up to what we have today?  How many of these pioneers survived the bust, either as individuals or their websites and what are they doing now?  Did any of them forsake the web and become an artisanal baker or survivalist sheep farmer?  The purpose of this new blog project is to have a look at each of these interviews, wallow in the nostalgia and then see what happened next.  Twenty years has been a long time online, so it'll be interesting to see how many of these innovators became the establishment and the extent to which they've truly guided how the web and internet "are" as a "thing".


It seems only fair that we begin with the author(s).  The Foreword is written by Paul Taylor, who as his Linked-In indicates was for many years a technology journalist at the FT apart from during a two year window in 2000-2002 (around the publication of the book) when he co-founded the451.com whose first appearance on the Wayback Machine is this placeholder website in May 2000:

By June 2000 it had begun publication:



Sadly none of the news stories seem to have been captured by the Wayback Machine.  But already we're at the apex of turn of the millennium website styling.  WAP was the forerunner of the "mobile" version of websites we have today, but ironically the main website here is what would be considered the mobile version now.  the451.com is already confidently predicting the end of paper, with its name and the idea that they're "lighting a fire under conventional technology news".

By 2003, the site had gone from being overtly newsy to providing "an analyst firm providing insight and commentary in the technology" and is still in business, even if it's no longer giving its analysis away for free and obscures the origin of its name through cool-blue colour scheme.



As per his Linked-In profile, Taylor would continue at the FT until 2014 when he'd jump ship to SAP, a technology market intelligence firm which would seem to be one of 451's competitors.  How many of the individuals named in this book will be revealed as having a similar career path?



The book's author Louise Proddow began her career as a marketing communications manager for Toshiba (1991-1993) before moving to Sun Microsystems in 1994 where she remained until 2005 as Global Director Strategic Programs & Marcoms Campaigns which she mentions in the acknowledgements to this book as a way of explaining how she was able to contact this variety of people.  In the same period, she wrote from Guardian columns here and here which can be seen as forerunners to the book, especially the introduction.

As she says on her Linked-In, she went from there to Nokia, as Head of Marketing, thence to Dell, before in 2011 becoming the founder of Tweak Marketing and then taking a career swerve in Rejuvage an "anti-aging" website.  Here she is introducing the company on YouTube:



After twenty years, Praddow has gone on to create just the sort of start-up that she surveyed, as you'll see, in her 2000 book.  The future just happened.

Audrey for very Liddell.

Books At the beginning of the year I wrote about how combining an Amazon Kindle purchase with its "narration" means you can buy audiobooks at a fraction of the cost.

Here's a classic example:

Keris notices that the Busy Philips autobiograph This Will Only Hurt A Little is just 99p on Kindle today.

But the added Audible narration is just £2.99. So you can get the digital book and audio combined for £3.98, which is £34.48 if you bought them separately.

Yes, I bought them.  I regret nothing.



Adorable.

Resolutions: Update.

Life About a month ago, I posted a list of my new year's resolutions. Let's see how guilty I should be feeling.

I want to be healthier and lose weight.

- No chocolate
- No sweets
- No biscuits
- No cake
- No bread
- No cheese
- In fact as little dairy as possible
- Eat more fruit and veg
- Eat smaller portions
- More exercise


Yes, broken them all. Last a week or two and then the temptation was too great and the hunger became to interfere with my anxiety. This stuff is hard, especially with my lifestyle. That said, I've only been having a can of soup each day which has to be a good thing, right?

I want to be more respectful to food.

- No sauces or condiments unless they're integral to the dish.

Kept to this, oddly, even to the point of not having gravy on roasted meat. All sorts of flavours suddenly revealed for better or worse.

I want to keep my film collection static.

- Do not buy any new or second hand region 2/B dvds or blu-rays this year unless they're MCU, Doctor Who, Star Wars or Network releases or Shakespeare.

Kept to this too.

I want to reduce my Big Finish backlog to zero.

- Listen to Big Finish during the walk to and from work.

And this. Almost at the end of my backlog of Tom related audios.

I want to keep my book collection static.

- No more new books unless they're Doctor Who TARGET novelisations or on audio.

I have bought the Kindle version of All The President's Men, but since I already had the paperback waiting to be read, I decided that was allowed especially for 99p.

Embrace the whole of the Sugababes.

- Listen through the albums and re-appraise Sweet 7.

Not yet. But I look forward to the day.

The Doctor is now an Oscar Nominee.



Film Plenty of actors with guest appearances in Doctor Who have been nominated and even won an Oscar, and although Peter Capaldi's short film, Franz Kafka's It's a Wonderful Life won an academy award, Richard E Grant's nod in the Best Actor category is the first time someone who's played the main character in the franchise has found himself in amongst the top ticket. Grant's played the Doctor twice - in Curse of the Fatal Death as one of Rowan Atkinson's successors and later in Scream of the Shalka, the official continuation of the Doctors adventures for the five minutes before Russell T Davies ignited the revival.

Before any of you suggest neither are canonical, at this point the idea of canonicity in Doctor Who is pretty redundant.  But if you really must, there's enough leeway in the 'verse thanks to alternate reality stories interacting with the primeverse, whatever that means, that the Atkinson Doctor, the Shalka Doctor, Peter Cushing and any of the other fragments are just as legitimate as the person we more usually recognise as the Doctor.  So for the purposes of making history, Richard E Grant is the first Doctor to become nominated for their acting.

With all of that sorted out, here are my serious predictions for the night. What I'd like to win and what will win. I've skipped categories when I haven't a clue.

BEST PICTURE
Like: "Roma"
Will: "A Star Is Born"

ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE
Like: Marina de Tavira, "Roma"
Will: Amy Adams, "Vice"

ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE
Like: Richard E. Grant, "Can You Ever Forgive Me"
Will: Sam Elliott, "A Star Is Born"

FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM
Like: "Roma"
Will: "Roma"

ORIGINAL SONG
Like: "When A Cowboy Trades His Spurs For Wings" - "The Ballad of Buster Scruggs"
Will: "Shallow" - "A Star Is Born"

ANIMATED FEATURE FILM
Like: "Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse"
Will: "Isle of Dogs"

ADAPTED SCREENPLAY
Like: "BlacKkKlansman"
Will: "BlacLlansman"

ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY
Like: "Roma"
Will: "The Favourite"

ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE
Like: Olivia Colman, "The Favourite"
Will: Glenn Close, "The Wife"

DIRECTOR
Like: Alfonso Cuarón, "Roma"
Will: Adam McKay, "Vice"

PRODUCTION DESIGN
Like: "Black Panther"
Will: "Black Panther"

CINEMATOGRAPHY
Like: "Roma"
Will: "Roma"

COSTUME DESIGN
Like: "Black Panther"
Will: "The Favourite"

SOUND EDITING
Like: "A Quiet Place"
Will: "Bohemian Rhapsody"

SOUND MIXING
Like: "Black Panther"
Will: "Bohemian Rhapsody"

ORIGINAL SCORE
Like: "Black Panther"
Will: "Black Panther"

VISUAL EFFECTS
Like: "Avengers: Infinity War"
Will: "Ready Player One"

Stairs.

Life Yesterday in London I spent a lot of time walking up stairs. There were the stairs in shops, in Muji and Foyles and tube stations. There were the steps around the National Gallery up to the Van Dyke room and back again at the end of the day.  Then there were the some six hundred stairs to the top of the dome of St Paul's Cathedral and six hundred back down again.

Rather than spending my Christmas money this year on the usual mix of appliances and something to play on them, I've decided to pay the entry fee into places which I might not otherwise be able to justify the expense.  St Paul's Cathedral's costs in and around twenty pounds to get in which seems like an awful lot when there's already an amazing cathedral or two in my own city.

It's worth every penny.  Having visited Europe, the architect Chris Wren took the demolition of the Norman church which stood in its place previously in the great fire, to bring what amounts to a European-style edifice to our capital city, a massive dome topped structure which also oddly feels quite intimate and between the crypt and the tower offers far too much to see in one day.

After lunch (an only ok cheese role in the cafe) and with an hour to fill until a guided tour, I simply decided to look at the place and with the baroque paintings in the main dome and the golden mosaics across the walls, I realised the best way to do that was from the floor.  So lay down in the middle of the dome and simply looked.  Here's what I saw:



I was just keying up to take another photo which didn't chop off the side windows when I was told by a invigilator that photography was not allowed inside the cathedral.  I asked if it was ok that I was on the floor and she said it was fine but that I might want to move when the lunchtime service was about to begin.   I was a foot away from a lectern which she'd just put in place.

The tour was an incredibly dense history lesson not just of the cathedral but the various luminaries memorialised and buried there.  The crypt is essentially where all of the local historical celebrities not in Westerminster Abbey are buried.  In one corner, it's possible to find yourself standing on the graves of Turner, Leighton, Holman Hunt. Moore and Reynolds.

Then it was time to visit the top of the cathedral.  There's a pain barrier when hunting up that many steps in a confined space.  The tendency is to attack them quick at the beginning, with gasping and heartache pretty soon afterwards.  Then there's the pain barrier, then there's the moment after the pain barrier and then there's simply getting it done.

But it was well worth it.  Here's me and my big nose, at the top, on the Golden Gallery looking out across London:



And here are some of the things I was looking at:









St Pauls is 111m high or 365 feet. Wren purposefully built the cathedral so it would be the same height as all the days in the year. From up there it seemed like the highest I've ever stood out side of a plane, but the Eiffel Tower is just under three time taller, so that's still my personal record.  Nevertheless, like the interior of the cathedral, there so much to see, not enough time to see them. 

But I'll try.