Navigating Glastonbury 2024.


Music  Hope you're all enjoying Glastonbury this weekend, even from your armchair.  After a similar posts proved popular in the last couple of years, I've decided to repeat the exercise for 2024.  As I explained last year, the navigation of the various stages and sets on the BBC website isn't particularly ideal.  Unlike the previous decade when the line-up was structured around stages, this year, everything is mostly just bunged in all together under different genres.

There is a line-up page on the BBC Glastonbury site which does break the acts down into stages but it requires at least a couple of clicks to get anywhere and you can eventually click through to the iPlayer page it's not especially intuitive, which doesn't matter exactly, but it's still a lot of effort.  Plus it's sometimes difficult on the iPlayer to see the difference between a broadcast highlights show and a full set.  The list below will only have the full set unless there's no other choice.

So  I've created a breakdown of Glastonbury by stage with links to these full sets - most of Friday is already there and I'll keep updating this over the weekend checking in now and then.  Most stages it's every act apart from the first few (sorry fans of Squeeze).  The links below should be valid for a month so you have until near the end of July to catch up.  Obviously this is only helpful if you're watching things on a tablet or PC.  You could always try casting them I suppose.  Anyway, on with the show:


Pyramid Stage

Friday

Squeeze

Saturday

Ayra Starr
Femi Kuti

Sunday

Birmingham Royal Ballet


Other Stage 

Friday

The Snuts
Annie Mac

Saturday

The Staves
Jamie Webster

Sunday

Rachel Chinouriri
The Zutons



West Holts Stage

Friday

Asha Puthli
Sofia Koutesis

Saturday

The Skatalites
47soul

Sunday

Jalen Ngonda
Matthew Halsall


Woodsies

Friday

Lambrini Girls
Voice Of Baceprot

Saturday

Gossip
High Vis
Kneecap

Sunday

The Ks
Jayahadadream


The Park Stage

Friday

Moonchild Sanelly
Lynks

Saturday

Kara Jackson
Johnny Flynn

Sunday

Lime Garden
Problem Patterns
Tanita Tikaram

* The TV broadcast

Craven Museum and Gallery (22).


Books   Since there's now a checklist and everything, I've been trying to decide what to call the endeavour of trying to see all of the first editions of the collections of Shakespeare's plays and it's not until I was standing on a platform at Leeds Station waiting for the connecting train between Liverpool and Skipton that I decided to go back to my very brief flirtation with drawing lines through train class numbers in another type of book and decided I've been Folio Spotting.  I'm a foliospotter.

So this erm, foliospotting trip was to the Craven Museum and Gallery in Skipton which has a partial edition in its exhibition space.  As Rasmussen and West's The Shakespeare First Folios (the foliospotters equivalent of the Diesel & Electric Loco Register) indicates there aren't actually that many copies internationally that you can apprehend, most of them only brought out on special occasions either for security reasons or due to their fragility.

The Craven was recently nominated for a Art Fund Museum of the Year award and it's this report in The Guardian which prompted me to book at ticket to Yorkshire.  The last time I visited Skipton was in my undergraduate days when you could travel anywhere in West Yorkshire by bus from Leeds at the weekend for 60p.  Skipton would have been the furthest I went, two hours there, two hours back.  I'm not sure I would have had the patience now, although it was roughly three hours from Liverpool by train.

Judging by the accession number. the book seems like a very late entry into the catalogue because it had only recently been made available to the public as a First Folio.  For much of its time at the Craven it was been designated as a Second Folio, and it wasn't until 2003 that the scholar Anthony West, the West of the The Shakespeare First Folios, studied the pages and determined that they were from the 1623 original.  As he and Rasmussen say, "Security was immediately increased".

But it took until March 2011 for the necessary funds to be gathered for the current secure display case to be added to Craven's exhibition, which is accompanied by video explaining the importance of the book narrated by Yorkshire's own Patrick Stewart and wall panels describing the provenance of the book.  The Craven Museum was recently refurbished (hence the nomination) but judging by the descriptions this corner seems like it's much the same as it was ten years before.

The provenance of this folio is minimal.  The trail begins with John James Wilkinson, who after selling his cotton and tobacco business became a naturalist studying marine insects who also had an interest in literature, but there's no indication of how he acquired it.  When he died in 1919, the Folio was inherited by his sister Ann who then bequeathed it to the town of Skipton in 1936, which is when it was misidentified as a Second Folio.

The Guardian piece suggests it then sat in a cupboard beneath a sink for the intervening decades until the new identification.  It was probably easily overlooked because as you can see from the digitised version, it's missing the title pages and comedies so without the front page you could imagine various staff over the years not really thinking it was anything more than a pile of old papers because why would they even have a Shakespeare First Folio?

Now that I am foliospotting, I'm going to have to step up my game.  There are still plenty of documentaries to look at but with the re-opening of the Folger Shakespeare Library and its display of all the Shakespeare folios they own, I'm already looking at the logistics of visiting Washington DC.  How can any foliospotter turn down the opportunity to see our equivalent of Llandudno Junction traction maintenance depot?